2019 JUN 21 RC Church. Pope calls for theological reforms in Catholic schools to promote “common mission of peace” with Islam.

2019 JUN 21 ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH: Pope calls for theological reforms in Catholic schools to promote “common mission of peace” with Islam. https://www.jihadwatch.org/2019/06/pope-calls-for-theological-reforms-in-catholic-schools-to-promote-common-mission-of-peace-with-islam …   Chrislam (gotquestions .org/Chrislam.html)

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All Major Religions Are Paths To Same God; according to Pope Francis!

Profile: Pope Francis (01) feature

Beware of Wolves Dressed in Sheep's Clothing
A new video has just been released in which Pope Francis very clearly expresses his belief that all of the major religions are different paths to the same God.

He says that while people from various global faiths may be “seeking God or meeting God in different ways” that it is important to keep in mind that “we are all children of God”.

This is the most recent example that shows that the Pope has completely abandoned any notion that a relationship with God is available only through Jesus Christ.

As he has done throughout his papacy, he continues to lay the groundwork for the coming one world religion, and yet hardly anyone seems upset by this.

When I first heard of this new video, I was so stunned that I thought that it might be a joke. But the truth is that this video is very real. The following comes from an article that was put out by Catholic News Agency…

The Popes first-ever video message on his monthly prayer intentions was released Tuesday, highlighting the importance of interreligious dialogue and the beliefs different faith traditions hold in common, such as the figure of God and love.

Many think differently, feel differently, seeking God or meeting God in different ways. In this crowd, in this range of religions, there is only one certainty that we have for all: we are all children of God,

Pope Francis said in his message, released Jan. 6, the feast of the Epiphany.

But it isnt just Pope Francis speaking in this video. In fact, one section of the video features leaders from various global religions expressing faith in their respective deities. The following comes from an article about this new video that was posted on Christian News Network…

The video then features clips of those from different world religions declaring belief in their various deities.

“I have confidence in Buddha,” a female lama announces.

I believe in God,” a rabbi affirms.

“I believe in Jesus Christ,” a priest states.

“I believe in Allah,” an Islamic leader declares.

Are you shocked yet?

The Pope closes the video with an appeal for people from every religion to talk with one another and to work with one another. Here is more from Catholic News Agency…

Later on, after the Pope affirms that all, regardless of their religious profession, are children of God, the faith leaders state their common belief in love.

Pope Francis closes the video by expressing his hope that viewers “will spread my prayer request this month: that sincere dialogue among men and women of different faiths may produce fruits of peace and justice. I have confidence in your prayers.”

Of course this is not the first time that Pope Francis has done something like this. Very early in his papacy, he authorized “Islamic prayers and readings from the Quran” at the Vatican for the first time ever.

And as I documented in a previous article entitled “In New York, Pope Francis Embraced Chrislam And Laid A Foundation For A One World Religion”, during his visit to St. Patricks Cathedral in Manhattan he made it very clear that he believes that Christians and Muslims worship the same God. The following is how he began his address…

I would like to express two sentiments for my Muslim brothers and sisters: Firstly, my greetings as they celebrate the feast of sacrifice. I would have wished my greeting to be warmer. My sentiments of closeness, my sentiments of closeness in the face of tragedy. The tragedy that they suffered in Mecca.

In this moment, I give assurances of my prayers. I unite myself with you all. A prayer to almighty god, all merciful.

In Islam, one of Allahs primary titles is “the all-merciful one”. If you doubt this, just do a Google search. And this certainly was not the first time that Pope Francis has used such language. For example, check out the following excerpt from remarks that he made during his very first ecumenical meeting as Pope…

I then greet and cordially thank you all, dear friends belonging to other religious traditions; first of all the Muslims, who worship the one God, living and merciful, and call upon Him in prayer, and all of you. I really appreciate your presence: in it I see a tangible sign of the will to grow in mutual esteem and cooperation for the common good of humanity.

Are you starting to get the picture?

Pope Francis believes that all religions are different paths to the same God, and he is working hard to lay a foundation for the coming one world religion.

After watching this most recent video, I dont know how anyone can possibly deny that.

However, there are some religious people that Pope Francis does not like. Just recently, he referred to Christian fundamentalism as “a sickness”, and he made it clear that there was no room for it in Catholicism.

So precisely what is “fundamentalism”?

Google defines it as “a form of a religion, especially Islam or Protestant Christianity, that upholds belief in the strict, literal interpretation of scripture.”

Does this mean that Pope Francis is against any Christian that believes in a literal interpretation of the Bible?


That does appear to be what he is saying, and without a doubt those would be the Christians that would be against the kind of one world religion that he appears to be promoting.

Nearly 2000 years ago, the Apostle John warned us that a one world religion was coming, and now we can see that it is coming to fruition.

4cminews Acknowledgements: Thanks to JF Western Australia for making us aware of this issue

2016, January 18. | By Economic Collapse Blog / Michael Snyder | Source: prophecynewswatch.com "Pope Francis Says All Major Religions Are Paths To Same God"

Related:

Date: 2016, January 9
By: Heather Clark
Source: christiannews.net
Title: “‘Pope Francis’ Calls for Collaboration With World’s Religions, Those Who ‘Meet God in Different Ways’”
Date: 2016, January 11
By: Michael Snyder – End Of The American Dream
Source: infowars.com
Title: “One World Religion: Pope Francis says ALL Major Religions are ‘Meeting God in Different Ways’”

Date: 2016, January 7
By: Elise Harris | Vatican City |
Source: catholicnewsagency.com
Title: “In first prayer video, Pope stresses interfaith unity: ‘We are all children of God'”
Date: 2016, January  7
By: Carey Lodge | Christian Today Journalist
Source: christiantoday.com
Title: “Pope Francis releases emotional new video: Regardless of religion, we are all children of God”

Origins of ‘Gospel of Jesus’s Wife’ Begin to Emerge

Questions ? (01) feature

Written in Coptic (an Egyptian language), the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife, if authentic, suggests that some people in ancient times believed Jesus was married, apparently to Mary Magdalene. Credit: Photo courtesy Harvard Divinity School View full size image

Written in Coptic (an Egyptian language), the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife, if authentic, suggests that some people in ancient times believed Jesus was married, apparently to Mary Magdalene.

The truth may be finally emerging about the “Gospel of Jesus’s Wife,” a highly controversial papyrus suggesting that some people, in ancient times, believed Jesus was married to Mary Magdalene. New research on the papyrus’ ink points to the possibility that it is authentic, researchers say, while newly obtained documents may shed light on the origins of the business-card-sized fragment.

Debate about the credibility of the “gospel” began as soon as Harvard University professor Karen King reported her discovery of the papyrus in September 2012. Written in Coptic (an Egyptian language), the papyrus fragment contains a translated line that reads, “Jesus said to them, ‘My wife …'” and also refers to a “Mary,” possibly Mary Magdalene.

King had tentatively dated the papyrus to the fourth century, saying it may be a copy of a gospel written in the second century in Greek. [Read Translation of Gospel of Jesus’s Wife Papyrus]

Analysis of the papyrus, detailed last year in the Harvard Theological Review journal, suggested the papyrus dates back around 1,200 years (somewhere between the sixth and ninth centuries) while the ink is of a type that could have been created at that time. These findings have led King to support the text’s authenticity.

However over the past year many scholars have come to the conclusion that the papyrus is a modern-day forgery, though King and a few other researchers say they are not ready to concede this: “At this point, when discussions and research are ongoing, I think it is important, however difficult, to stay open regarding the possible dates of the inscription and other matters of interpretation,” wrote King in a letter recently published in the magazine Biblical Archaeological Review. King has not responded to several interview requests from Live Science.

Now, researchers at Columbia University are running new tests on the ink used on the papyrus. Initial tests published by the Columbia University team in 2014 indicated the ink could have been made in ancient times. Researchers are saying little until their report is published; however they did talk about one finding that could provide some support for its authenticity.

A gospel steeped in mystery

The current owner of the papyrus has insisted on remaining anonymous, claiming that he bought the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife, along with other Coptic texts, in 1999 from a man named Hans-Ulrich Laukamp. This person, in turn, got it from Potsdam, in what was East Germany, in 1963, the owner said.

Laukamp died in 2002, and the claim that he owned the text has been strongly disputed: Rene Ernest, the man whom Laukamp and his wife Helga charged with representing their estate, said that Laukamp had no interest in antiquities, did not collect them and was living in West Berlin in 1963. Therefore, he couldn’t have crossed the Berlin Wall into Potsdam. Axel Herzsprung, a business partner of Laukamp’s, similarly said that Laukamp never had an interest in antiquities and never owned a papyrus. Laukamp has no children or living relatives who could verify these claims. [6 Archaeological Forgeries That Tried to Change History]

Over the past few months, new documents have been found that not only reconstruct Laukamp’s life in greater detail, but also provide a new way to check the anonymous owner’s story.

King reported in a 2014 Harvard Theological Review article that the anonymous owner “provided me with a photocopy of a contract for the sale of ‘6 Coptic papyrus fragments, one believed to be a Gospel’ from Hans-Ulrich Laukamp, dated Nov. 12, 1999, and signed by both parties.” King also notes that “a handwritten comment on the contract states, ‘Seller surrenders photocopies of correspondence in German. Papyri were acquired in 1963 by the seller in Potsdam (East Germany).'”

After searching public databases in Florida a Live Science reporter uncovered seven signatures signed by Laukamp between 1997 and 2001 on five notarized documents. Anyone can search these databases and download these documents. These signatures can be compared with the signature recording the sale of the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife — providing another way to verify or disprove the story of how the “gospel” made its way to Harvard.

While Harvard University would have to work with forensic handwriting experts to verify the signature, the fact that these notarized documents exist, and are publicly available, presents the opportunity to see if Laukamp really did own the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife. Forensic handwriting analysis, while not always conclusive, has been used to determine if signatures made on documents or works of art are authentic or forged.

If Laukamp did own the papyrus, authentic or not, then the origins of the enigmatic text lie with him. The new Laukamp documents allow the story of his life between 1995 and 2002 to be told in some detail. However if Laukamp didn’t own the papyrus and the anonymous owner has not been truthful, then further doubt would be cast on the papyrus’ authenticity, and information leading to the identity, motives and techniques of the forgers could be found.

Authentic or forged?

One important find, which indicates the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife is a fake, was made last year by Christian Askeland, a research associate with the Institute for Septuagint and Biblical Research in Wuppertal, Germany. He examined a second Coptic papyrus containing part of the Gospel of John, which the anonymous owner of the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife had also given to Harvard. This text was likewise supposedly purchased from Laukamp, and radiocarbon testing of that papyrus similarly found that it dates back around 1,200 years. [See Images of the Ancient Gospel of Judas]

Askeland found that the text and line breaks— where one line of a text ends and another begins — are identical to those of another papyrus, published in a 1924 book. That second papyrus was written in a dialect of Coptic called Lycopolitan, which went extinct around 1,500 years ago. Askeland concluded that the John papyrus is a forgery. Furthermore, it shares other features with the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife, Askeland said, suggesting both are forgeries.

“The two Coptic fragments clearly shared the same ink, writing implement and scribal hand. The same artisan had created both essentially at the same time,” Askeland wrote in a paper recently published in the journal New Testament Studies.

King objected to this conclusion in her Biblical Archaeology Review letter, noting that the John fragment could have been copied in ancient times, long after Lycopolitan went extinct, from a text that had similar line breaks.

In addition, James Yardley, a senior research scientist at Columbia University, told Live Science that the new tests confirm that the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife holds different ink than the John papyrus. This could undercut Askeland’s argument that the two papyri were written by the same person.

“In our first exploration, we did state that the inks used for the two documents of interest [the John papyrus and the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife] were quite different. The more recent results do confirm this observation strongly,” Yardley told Live Science.

He added that until his new research is published in a peer-reviewed journal, he doesn’t want to say anything more publicly. And once it’s published, Askeland and other researchers will have a chance to respond.

Askeland’s find is far from the only argument that the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife is a fake: A number of scholars have noted that the Coptic writing in the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife is similar to another early Christian text called the “Gospel of Thomas,” even including a modern-day typo made in a 2002 edition of the Gospel of Thomas that is available for free online. That typo indicates the forgers copied from this modern-day text. King disputed this assertion in 2014, saying that ancient scribes made grammatical errors similar to the modern-day typo.

King and communications staff at Harvard Divinity School have not responded to repeated requests for comment.

by Owen Jarus, Live Science Contributor | August 24, 2015 | Source:  livescience.com "Origins of 'Gospel of Jesus's Wife' Begin to Emerge"

7 Traits of False Teachers — Charisma News

Wolves don’t advertise, instead, they “look” like sheep. (Flickr/Creative Commons)

A false teacher can be anyone in a position of spiritual authority or claiming to be. Wolves don’t often attack wolves, but they do go after sheep. They bring destructive teachings and lies into the church, often by telling people what they want to hear (Jer. 23). They provide layers of truth mixed with error, but even a broken clock is right twice a day.

Jesus said, “Beware of false prophets who come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ravenous wolves. You will know them by their fruit” (Matthew 7:15-16).

“Beware” means to be on alert, to discern what is being said.

False teachers take advantage of the fact that many people are not well-educated in fundamental biblical truths. To detect a counterfeit, one must first know what the original looks like. It’s impossible to gain a clear picture of absolute truth without going directly to God’s Word. Unless one is firmly grounded in God’s Word and led by His Spirit, one can easily be led astray.

Wolves don’t advertise, instead, they “look” like sheep.

False teachers aren’t dressed in red holding a pitchfork. They often look the same as everyone else. They subtly challenge the inerrancy and authority of Scripture, and they add to salvation so that it’s not through Christ alone. Legitimate teachers recognize the deity of Christ. False teachers promote salvation through works and not through faith alone. One must belong to their society, institution, or church in order to be saved. This is a false gospel.

Jesus encourages His followers to be fruit inspectors.

I came across a great article from the Gospel Coalition written by Colin Smith titled “7 Traits of False Teachers.” This precise article identifies the fruit of false teachers. The link is at the bottom for those who want to read Smith’s complete piece. I’m going to spend the next few minutes quoting directly from it. He compares the authentic with the counterfeit from 1 and 2 Peter. Smith writes:

1. Different Source
Where does their message come from?

Peter says, “For we have not followed cleverly devised myths when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we were eyewitnesses of His majesty” (2 Pet. 1:16). And then he says the false teachers exploit you “with deceptive words” (2 Pet. 2:3). So the true teacher sources what he says from the Bible. The false teacher relies on his own creativity.

 2. Different Message
—What is the substance of the message?

For the true teacher, Jesus Christ is central. “His divine power has given to us all things that pertain to life and godliness” (2 Pet. 1:3). For the false teacher, Jesus is at the margins: “But there were also false prophets among the people, just as there will be false teachers among you, who will secretly bring in destructive heresies” (2 Pet. 2:1). Notice the word secretly. It’s rare for someone in church to openly deny Jesus. Movement away from the centrality of Christ is subtle. The false teacher will speak about how other people can help change your life, but if you listen carefully to what he is saying, you will see that Jesus Christ is not essential to his message.

 3. Different Position
—In what position will the message leave you?

The true Christian will “escape the corruption that is in the world through lust” (2 Pet. 1:4). Listen to how Peter describes the counterfeit Christian: “Although they promise them freedom, they themselves are slaves of corruption, for by that which a man is overcome, to this he is enslaved” (2 Pet. 2:19). The true believer is escaping corruption, while the counterfeit believer is mastered by it.

4. Different Character
—What kind of people does the message produce?

The true believer pursues goodness, knowledge, self-control, perseverance, godliness, brotherly kindness, and love (2 Pet. 1:5). The counterfeit Christian is marked by arrogance and slander (2 Pet. 2:10). They are “trained in greed” and “they have eyes full of adultery” (2 Pet. 2:14).

 5. Different Appeal
—Why should you listen to the message?

The true teacher appeals to Scripture. “And we have a more reliable word of prophecy, which you would do well to follow” (2 Pet. 1:19). God has spoken, and the true teacher appeals to His Word. The false teacher makes a rather different appeal: “For when they speak arrogant words of vanity, they entice by the lusts of the flesh and by depravity those who barely escaped from those who live in error” (2 Pet. 2:18).

 6. Different Fruit
—What result does the message have in people’s lives?

The true believer is effective and productive in his or her knowledge of Jesus Christ (2 Pet. 1:8). The counterfeit is “wells without water” (2:17). This is an extraordinary picture! They promise much but produce little.

 7. Different End
—Where does the message ultimately lead you?

Here we find the most disturbing contrast of all. The true believer will receive “entrance into the eternal kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ” (2 Pet. 1:11). The false believer will experience “swift destruction” (2 Pet. 2:1). “And in their greed they will exploit you with deceptive words. Their judgment, made long ago, does not linger, and their destruction does not slumber” (2 Pet. 2:3). Jesus tells us He will say to many who have been involved in ministry in His name, “Depart from me; I never knew you” (Matt. 7:21).

In “7 Traits of False Teachers,” Smith makes some great points, which beg the question to pastors:

If people are not changing and growing closer to God, are we challenging them or are we catering to what they want to hear?

WOLVES DON’T ADVERTISE, BUT GOD DOES.
He offers hope and salvation:

Call on Me.  I will never leave nor forsake you. Call on Me and I will heal your past and redeem your future. Call on Me and you will be saved
(cf.; Deuteronomy 31:6; Ezekiel 34:16; Joel 2:32).
09/23/2015 | Shane Idleman | Source:  charismanews.com "7 Traits of False Teachers"