Where Exactly is 3rd Temple’s Location according to the bible

Can you imagine the upheaval in political and religious thinking if the Temple Mount in Jerusalem is not the site of Solomon’s and Herod’s temples?

And what if the stones of the Wailing Wall are not what tradition says?

In this highly-researched, exciting book, the author proposes from current archaeological excavations and Scriptural corroboration that the true temple location is not where tradition teaches. Keep in mind, Tradition is always the enemy of truth.

John 8:32: the truth shall set you free.
The Question: What is the Truth about the Temple Location
Tools to Locate the Truth
1: THE WORD OF GOD
2: ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS

ZION = CITY OF DAVID

Nevertheless, David took the stronghold of Zion, that is, the city of David.

2 Samuel 5: 7

ZION = My Holy mountain = TEMPLE

2 Blow a trumpet in Zion;
    sound an alarm on my holy mountain!
Let all the inhabitants of the land tremble,
    for the day of the Lord is coming; it is near,

Joel 2:1

ZION = My Holy mountain = TEMPLE

17 “So you shall know that I am the Lord your God,
    who dwells in Zion, my holy mountain.
And Jerusalem shall be holy,
    and strangers shall never again pass through it.

Joel 3:17

ZION = where the Lord dwells = TEMPLE

21 I will avenge their blood,
    blood I have not avenged,
    for the Lord dwells in Zion.”

Joel 3:21

ZION = My holy hill = Christ reigning = TEMPLE

6 “As for me, I have set my King
    on Zion, my holy hill.”

Psalm 2:6

ZION = where the Lord dwells = TEMPLE

11 Sing praises to the Lord, who sits enthroned in Zion!
    Tell among the peoples his deeds!

Psalm 9:11

ZION = from sanctuary = TEMPLE

May he send you help from the sanctuary
    and give you support from Zion!

Psalm 20:2

ZION = Your holy TEMPLE

Praise is due to you, O God, in Zion,
    and to you shall vows be performed.

Blessed is the one you choose and bring near,
    to dwell in your courts!
We shall be satisfied with the goodness of your house,
    the holiness of your temple!

Psalm 65:1, 4

ZION = sanctuary = City of David = TEMPLE

16 For the Lord builds up Zion;
    he appears in his glory;

19 that he looked down from his holy height;
    from heaven the Lord looked at the earth,

Psalm 102:16,19

ZION = ark resting place = City of David = TEMPLE

Arise, O Lord, and go to your resting place,
    you and the ark of your might.

13 For the Lord has chosen Zion;
    he has desired it for his dwelling place:

Psalm 132:8,13

ZION = mountain of the Lord = house of God = TEMPLE

    and many peoples shall come, and say:
“Come, let us go up to the mountain of the Lord,
    to the house of the God of Jacob,
that he may teach us his ways
    and that we may walk in his paths.”
For out of Zion shall go forth the law,
    and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem.

Isaiah 2:3

ZION = Lord of Host reigning = place of TEMPLE

23 Then the moon will be confounded
    and the sun ashamed,
for the Lord of hosts reigns
    on Mount Zion and in Jerusalem,
and his glory will be before his elders.

Isaiah 24:23

ZION =  My holy mountain = house of the Lord = TEMPLE

20 And they shall bring all your brothers from all the nations as an offering to the Lord, on horses and in chariots and in litters and on mules and on dromedaries, to my holy mountain Jerusalem, says the Lord, just as the Israelites bring their grain offering in a clean vessel to the house of the Lord.

Isaiah 66:20

ZION = Jebusite city = City of David = TEMPLE

1 Then Solomon began to build the house of the Lord in Jerusalem on Mount Moriah, where the Lord had appeared to David his father, at the place that David had appointed, on the threshing floor of Ornan the Jebusite.

2 Chronicles 3:1


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Jerusalem is the Capital of Israel! 45th President of the United States

45th President Donald J Trump Statement Jerusalem is the Capital of Israel.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu remarks in response to US President Trump’s Statement.


At that time Jerusalem shall be called the throne of the Lord, and all nations shall gather to it, to the presence of the Lord in Jerusalem, and they shall no more stubbornly follow their own evil heart.

God Said. Jeremiah 3:17 ESV

For Zion’s sake I will not keep silent, and for Jerusalem’s sake I will not be quiet, until her righteousness goes forth as brightness, and her salvation as a burning torch. The nations shall see your righteousness, and all the kings your glory, and you shall be called by a new name that the mouth of the Lord will give. You shall be a crown of beauty in the hand of the Lord, and a royal diadem in the hand of your God. You shall no more be termed Forsaken, and your land shall no more be termed Desolate, but you shall be called My Delight Is in Her, and your land Married; for the Lord delights in you, and your land shall be married. For as a young man marries a young woman, so shall your sons marry you, and as the bridegroom rejoices over the bride, so shall your God rejoice over you. …

God Said. Isaiah 62:1-12 ESV

On that day living waters shall flow out from Jerusalem, half of them to the eastern sea and half of them to the western sea. It shall continue in summer as in winter. And the Lord will be king over all the earth. On that day the Lord will be one and his name one. The whole land shall be turned into a plain from Geba to Rimmon south of Jerusalem. But Jerusalem shall remain aloft on its site from the Gate of Benjamin to the place of the former gate, to the Corner Gate, and from the Tower of Hananel to the king’s winepresses. And it shall be inhabited, for there shall never again be a decree of utter destruction. Jerusalem shall dwell in security.

God Said. Zechariah 14:8-11 ESV

Statement by President Trump on Jerusalem

Diplomatic Reception Room

1:07 P.M. EST

THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. When I came into office, I promised to look at the world’s challenges with open eyes and very fresh thinking. We cannot solve our problems by making the same failed assumptions and repeating the same failed strategies of the past. Old challenges demand new approaches.

My announcement today marks the beginning of a new approach to conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.

In 1995, Congress adopted the Jerusalem Embassy Act, urging the federal government to relocate the American embassy to Jerusalem and to recognize that that city — and so importantly — is Israel’s capital. This act passed Congress by an overwhelming bipartisan majority and was reaffirmed by a unanimous vote of the Senate only six months ago.

Yet, for over 20 years, every previous American president has exercised the law’s waiver, refusing to move the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem or to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital city.

Presidents issued these waivers under the belief that delaying the recognition of Jerusalem would advance the cause of peace. Some say they lacked courage, but they made their best judgments based on facts as they understood them at the time. Nevertheless, the record is in. After more than two decades of waivers, we are no closer to a lasting peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. It would be folly to assume that repeating the exact same formula would now produce a different or better result.

Therefore, I have determined that it is time to officially recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

While previous presidents have made this a major campaign promise, they failed to deliver. Today, I am delivering.

I’ve judged this course of action to be in the best interests of the United States of America and the pursuit of peace between Israel and the Palestinians. This is a long-overdue step to advance the peace process and to work towards a lasting agreement.

Israel is a sovereign nation with the right like every other sovereign nation to determine its own capital. Acknowledging this as a fact is a necessary condition for achieving peace.

It was 70 years ago that the United States, under President Truman, recognized the State of Israel. Ever since then, Israel has made its capital in the city of Jerusalem — the capital the Jewish people established in ancient times. Today, Jerusalem is the seat of the modern Israeli government. It is the home of the Israeli parliament, the Knesset, as well as the Israeli Supreme Court. It is the location of the official residence of the Prime Minister and the President. It is the headquarters of many government ministries.

For decades, visiting American presidents, secretaries of state, and military leaders have met their Israeli counterparts in Jerusalem, as I did on my trip to Israel earlier this year.

Jerusalem is not just the heart of three great religions, but it is now also the heart of one of the most successful democracies in the world. Over the past seven decades, the Israeli people have built a country where Jews, Muslims, and Christians, and people of all faiths are free to live and worship according to their conscience and according to their beliefs.

Jerusalem is today, and must remain, a place where Jews pray at the Western Wall, where Christians walk the Stations of the Cross, and where Muslims worship at Al-Aqsa Mosque.

However, through all of these years, presidents representing the United States have declined to officially recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. In fact, we have declined to acknowledge any Israeli capital at all.

But today, we finally acknowledge the obvious: that Jerusalem is Israel’s capital. This is nothing more, or less, than a recognition of reality. It is also the right thing to do. It’s something that has to be done.

That is why, consistent with the Jerusalem Embassy Act, I am also directing the State Department to begin preparation to move the American embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. This will immediately begin the process of hiring architects, engineers, and planners, so that a new embassy, when completed, will be a magnificent tribute to peace.

In making these announcements, I also want to make one point very clear: This decision is not intended, in any way, to reflect a departure from our strong commitment to facilitate a lasting peace agreement. We want an agreement that is a great deal for the Israelis and a great deal for the Palestinians. We are not taking a position of any final status issues, including the specific boundaries of the Israeli sovereignty in Jerusalem, or the resolution of contested borders. Those questions are up to the parties involved.

The United States remains deeply committed to helping facilitate a peace agreement that is acceptable to both sides. I intend to do everything in my power to help forge such an agreement. Without question, Jerusalem is one of the most sensitive issues in those talks. The United States would support a two-state solution if agreed to by both sides.

In the meantime, I call on all parties to maintain the status quo at Jerusalem’s holy sites, including the Temple Mount, also known as Haram al-Sharif.

Above all, our greatest hope is for peace, the universal yearning in every human soul. With today’s action, I reaffirm my administration’s longstanding commitment to a future of peace and security for the region.

There will, of course, be disagreement and dissent regarding this announcement. But we are confident that ultimately, as we work through these disagreements, we will arrive at a peace and a place far greater in understanding and cooperation.

This sacred city should call forth the best in humanity, lifting our sights to what it is possible; not pulling us back and down to the old fights that have become so totally predictable. Peace is never beyond the grasp of those willing to reach.

So today, we call for calm, for moderation, and for the voices of tolerance to prevail over the purveyors of hate. Our children should inherit our love, not our conflicts.

I repeat the message I delivered at the historic and extraordinary summit in Saudi Arabia earlier this year: The Middle East is a region rich with culture, spirit, and history. Its people are brilliant, proud, and diverse, vibrant and strong. But the incredible future awaiting this region is held at bay by bloodshed, ignorance, and terror.

Vice President Pence will travel to the region in the coming days to reaffirm our commitment to work with partners throughout the Middle East to defeat radicalism that threatens the hopes and dreams of future generations.

It is time for the many who desire peace to expel the extremists from their midst. It is time for all civilized nations, and people, to respond to disagreement with reasoned debate –- not violence.

And it is time for young and moderate voices all across the Middle East to claim for themselves a bright and beautiful future.

So today, let us rededicate ourselves to a path of mutual understanding and respect. Let us rethink old assumptions and open our hearts and minds to possible and possibilities. And finally, I ask the leaders of the region — political and religious; Israeli and Palestinian; Jewish and Christian and Muslim — to join us in the noble quest for lasting peace.

Thank you. God bless you. God bless Israel. God bless the Palestinians. And God bless the United States. Thank you very much. Thank you.

(The proclamation is signed.)

END

1:19 P.M. EST

Original Source: whitehouse.gov/the-press-office

 

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Land of Israel

Facts feature (08)

The Land of Israel (Hebrew: אֶרֶץ יִשְׂרָאֵל‎ [Mishnaic/ Yemenite/ Masoritic Hebrew] ʼÉreṣ Yiśrāʼēl, [Modern Hebrew] Eretz Yisrael) is the traditional Jewish name for an area of indefinite geographical extension in the Southern Levant. Related biblical, religious and historical English terms include the Land of Canaan, the Promised Land, the Holy Land, and Palestine (q.v. Israel (disambiguation)).

The definitions of the limits of this territory vary between passages in the Hebrew Bible, with specific mentions in


  Genesis 15  ESV

  Exodus 23  ESV


  Numbers 34  ESV

  Ezekiel 47.  ESV


Nine times elsewhere in the Bible, the settled land is referred as “from Dan to Beersheba, and three times it is referred as “from the entrance of Hamath unto the brook of Egypt”

1 Kings 8:65 ESV

1 Chronicles 13:5 ESV

2 Chronicles 7:8 ESV

Etymology and biblical roots

 

1916 map of the Fertile Crescent by James Henry Breasted. The names used for the land are “Canaan” “Judah” “Palestine” and “Israel” click image to enlarge

Map of Eretz Israel in 1695 Amsterdam Haggada by Abraham Bar-Jacob. click image to enlarge

The Hebrew Bible provides three specific sets of borders for the “Promised Land”, each with a different purpose. Neither of the terms “Promised Land” (Ha’Aretz HaMuvtahat) or “Land of Israel” are used in these passages: (Genesis 15:13–21 ESV) , (Genesis 17:8 ESV) [21] and (Ezekiel 47:13–20 ESV); use the term “the land” (ha’aretz), as does (Deuteronomy 1:8 ESV) in which it is promised explicitly to “Abraham, Isaac and Jacob… and to their descendants after them,” whilst (Numbers 34:1–15 ESV) describes the “Land of Canaan” (Eretz Kna’an) which is allocated to nine and half of the twelve Israelite tribes after the Exodus. The expression “Land of Israel” is first used in a later book, (1 Samuel 13:19 ESV). It is defined in detail in the exilic Book of Ezekiel as a land where both the twelve tribes and the “strangers in (their) midst”, can claim inheritance.1)Rachel Havrelock, River Jordan: The Mythology of a Dividing Line,University of Chicago Press, 2011, p.21. The name “Israel” first appears in the Hebrew Bible as the name given by God to the patriarch Jacob (Genesis 32:28 ESV). Deriving from the name “Israel”, other designations that came to be associated with the Jewish people have included the “Children of Israel” or “Israelite”.

Biblical interpretations of the borders

 

Genesis 15

click image to enlarge

Genesis 15 (describing “this land”)

Note: Interpretations of the borders of the Promised Land, based on scriptural verses

(Genesis 15:18–21 ESV) describes what are known as “Borders of the Land” (Gevulot Ha-aretz),2)Kol Torah, vol. 13, no. 9, Torah Academy of Bergen County, 8 November 2003 which in Jewish tradition defines the extent of the land promised to the descendants of Abraham, through his son Isaac and grandson Jacob.3)See 6th and 7th portion commentaries by Rashi The passage describes the area as the land of the ten named ancient peoples then living there.

More precise geographical borders are given (Exodus 23:31 ESV) which describes borders as marked by the Red Sea (see debate below), the “Sea of the Philistines” i.e., the Mediterranean, and the “River”, the Euphrates), the traditional furthest extent of the Kingdom of David.4)Stuart, Douglas K., Exodus, B&H Publishing Group, 2006, p. 549 5)Tyndale Bible Dictionary, Walter A. Elwell, Philip Wesley Comfort, Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., 2001, p. 984

Genesis gives the border with Egypt as Nahar Mitzrayimnahar in Hebrew denotes a large river, never a wadi.

Exodus 23

click image to enlarge

Num. 34 (“Canaan“)

Eze. 47 (“this land”)

Note: Interpretations of the borders of the Promised Land, based on scriptural verses

A slightly more detailed definition is given in (Exodus 23:31 ESV), which describes the borders as “from the sea of reeds (Red Sea) to the Sea of the Philistines (Mediterranean sea) and from the desert to the Euphrates River”, though the Hebrew text of the Bible uses the name, “the River”, to refer to the Euphrates.

Only the “Red Sea” (Exodus 23:31 ESV)) and the Euphrates are mentioned to define the southern and eastern borders of the full land promised to the Israelites. The “Red Sea” corresponding to Hebrew Yam Suf was understood in ancient times to be the Erythraean Sea, as reflected in the Septuagint translation. Although the English name “Red Sea” is derived from this name (“Erythraean” derives from the Greek for red), the term denoted all the waters surrounding Arabia—including the Indian Ocean and the Persian Gulf, not merely the sea lying to the west of Arabia bearing this name in modern English. Thus the entire Arabian peninsula lies within the borders described. Modern maps depicting the region take a reticent view and often leave the southern and eastern borders vaguely defined. The borders of the land to be conquered given in Numbers have a precisely defined eastern border which included the Arabah and Jordan.

Numbers 34

(Numbers 34:1–15 ESV) describes the land allocated to the Israelite tribes after the Exodus. The tribes of Reuben, Gad and half of Manasseh received land east of the Jordan as explained in (Numbers 34:14–15 ESV). (Numbers 34:1–13 ESV) provides a detailed description of the borders of the land to be conquered west of the Jordan for the remaining tribes. The region is called “the Land of Canaan” (Eretz Kna’an) in (Numbers 34:2 ESV) and the borders are known in Jewish tradition as the “borders for those coming out of Egypt”. These borders are again mentioned in (Deuteronomy 1:6–8 ESV), (Deuteronomy 11:24 ESV) and (Joshua 1:4 ESV).

According to the Hebrew Bible, Canaan was the son of Ham who with his descendents had seized the land from the descendents of Shem according to the Book of Jubilees. Jewish tradition thus refers to the region as Canaan during the period between the Flood and the Israelite settlement. Eliezer Schweid sees Canaan as a geographical name, and Israel the spiritual name of the land. He writes: The uniqueness of the Land of Israel is thus “geo-theological” and not merely climatic. This is the land which faces the entrance of the spiritual world, that sphere of existence that lies beyond the physical world known to us through our senses. This is the key to the land’s unique status with regard to prophecy and prayer, and also with regard to the commandments.6)The Land of Israel: National Home Or Land of Destiny, By Eliezer Schweid, Translated by Deborah Greniman, Published 1985 Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, ISBN 0-8386-3234-3, p.56. Thus, the renaming of this landmarks a change in religious status, the origin of the Holy Land concept. (Numbers 34:1–13 ESV) uses the term Canaan strictly for the land west of the Jordan, but Land of Israel is used in Jewish tradition to denote the entire land of the Israelites. The English expression “Promised Land” can denote either the land promised to Abraham in Genesis or the land of Canaan, although the latter meaning is more common.

The border with Egypt is given as the Nachal Mitzrayim (Brook of Egypt) in Numbers, as well as in Deuteronomy and Ezekiel. Jewish tradition (as expressed in the commentaries of Rashi and Yehuda Halevi, as well as the Aramaic Targums) understand this as referring to the Nile; more precisely the Pelusian branch of the Nile Delta according to Halevi—a view supported by Egyptian and Assyrian texts. Saadia Gaon identified it as the “Wadi of El-Arish”, referring to the biblical Sukkot near Faiyum. Kaftor Vaferech placed it in the same region, which approximates the location of the former Pelusian branch of the Nile. 19th century Bible commentaries understood the identification as a reference to the Wadi of the coastal locality called El-Arish. Easton’s, however, notes a local tradition that the course of the river had changed and there was once a branch of the Nile where today there is a wadi. Biblical minimalists have suggested that the Besor is intended.

Deuteronomy 19

(Deuteronomy 19:8 ESV) indicates a certain fluidity of the borders of the promised land when it refers to the possibility that God would “enlarge your borders.” This expansion of territory means that Israel would receive “all the land he promised to give to your fathers”, which implies that the settlement actually fell short of what was promised. According to Jacob Milgrom, Deuteronomy refers to a more utopian map of the promised land, whose eastern border is the wilderness rather than the Jordan.7)Jacob Milgrom, Numbers (JPS Torah Commentary; Philadelphia: JPS, 1990), 502.

Paul R. Williamson notes that a “close examination of the relevant promissory texts” supports a “wider interpretation of the promised land” in which it is not “restricted absolutely to one geographical locale.” He argues that “the map of the promised land was never seen permanently fixed, but was subject to at least some degree of expansion and redefinition.”8)Paul R. Williamson, “Promise and Fulfilment: The Territorial Inheritance”, in Philip Johnston and Peter Walker (eds.), The Land of Promise: Biblical, Theological and Contemporary Perspectives (Leicester: Apollos, 2000), 20–21.

Ezekiel 47

(Ezekiel 47:13–20 ESV) provides a definition of borders of land in which the twelve tribes of Israel will live during the final redemption, at the end of days. The borders of the land described by the text in Ezekiel include the northern border of modern Lebanon, eastwards (the way of Hethlon) to Zedad and Hazar-enan in modern Syria; south by southwest to the area of Busra on the Syrian border (area of Hauran in Ezekiel); follows the Jordan River between the West Bank and the land of Gilead to Tamar (Ein Gedi) on the western shore of the Dead Sea; From Tamar to Meribah Kadesh (Kadesh Barnea), then along the Brook of Egypt (see debate below) to the Mediterranean Sea. The territory defined by these borders is divided into twelve strips, one for each of the twelve tribes.

Hence, Numbers 34 and Ezekiel 47 define different but similar borders which include the whole of contemporary Lebanon, both the West Bank and the Gaza Strip and Israel, except for the South Negev and Eilat. Small parts of Syria are also included.

From Dan to Beersheba

The common biblical phrase used to refer to the territories actually settled by the Israelites (as opposed to military conquests) is “from Dan to Beersheba” (or its variant “from Beersheba to Dan”), which occurs many times in the Bible.

It is found in the biblical verses

Judges 20:1 ESV

1 Samuel 3:20 ESV

2 Samuel 3:10 ESV

2 Samuel 17:11 ESV

2 Samuel 24:2 ESV

2 Samuel 24:15 ESV

1 Kings 4:25 ESV

1 Chronicles 21:2 ESV

2 Chronicles 30:5. ESV

Division of Tribes

The 12 tribes of Israel are divided in 1 Kings 11. In the chapter, King Solomon‘s sins lead to Israelites forfeiting 10 of the 12 tribes:

vs.30 and Ahijah took hold of the new cloak he was wearing and tore it into twelve pieces. vs.31 Then he said to Jeroboam, “Take ten pieces for yourself, for this is what the Lord, the God of Israel, says: ‘See, I am going to tear the kingdom out of Solomon’s hand and give you ten tribes. vs.32 But for the sake of my servant David and the city of Jerusalem, which I have chosen out of all the tribes of Israel, he will have one tribe. vs.33 I will do this because they have forsaken me and worshiped Ashtoreth the goddess of the Sidonians, Chemosh the god of the Moabites, and Molek the god of the Ammonites, and have not walked in obedience to me, nor done what is right in my eyes, nor kept my decrees and laws as David, Solomon’s father, did. vs.34 “‘But I will not take the whole kingdom out of Solomon’s hand; I have made him ruler all the days of his life for the sake of David my servant, whom I chose and who obeyed my commands and decrees. vs.35 I will take the kingdom from his son’s hands and give you ten tribes. vs.36 I will give one tribe to his son so that David my servant may always have a lamp before me in Jerusalem, the city where I chose to put my Name.

— 1 Kings 11:30- 369) “1 Kings 11 NIV – Solomon’s Wives – King Solomon”. Bible Gateway. Retrieved 2013-08-11.

sources: wikipedia.org

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References   [ + ]

1. Rachel Havrelock, River Jordan: The Mythology of a Dividing Line,University of Chicago Press, 2011, p.21.
2. Kol Torah, vol. 13, no. 9, Torah Academy of Bergen County, 8 November 2003
3. See 6th and 7th portion commentaries by Rashi
4. Stuart, Douglas K., Exodus, B&H Publishing Group, 2006, p. 549
5. Tyndale Bible Dictionary, Walter A. Elwell, Philip Wesley Comfort, Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., 2001, p. 984
6. The Land of Israel: National Home Or Land of Destiny, By Eliezer Schweid, Translated by Deborah Greniman, Published 1985 Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, ISBN 0-8386-3234-3, p.56.
7. Jacob Milgrom, Numbers (JPS Torah Commentary; Philadelphia: JPS, 1990), 502.
8. Paul R. Williamson, “Promise and Fulfilment: The Territorial Inheritance”, in Philip Johnston and Peter Walker (eds.), The Land of Promise: Biblical, Theological and Contemporary Perspectives (Leicester: Apollos, 2000), 20–21.
9. “1 Kings 11 NIV – Solomon’s Wives – King Solomon”. Bible Gateway. Retrieved 2013-08-11.

Jerusalem: Real Facts

Israel: Star of David Button feature
JERUSALEM
21Deep down the Palestinians know they are occupying a Jewish holy site, and from time to time they starts riots on the temple mount

 

JERUSALEM in (QURAN) (BIBLE)
22

After all, Jerusalem (al quds) is mentioned in the Quran: 0 times, While in the Bible jerusalem is mentioned: 667 times. 
 But not only Jerusalem is not mentioned in the Quran. “Palestine” is not mentioned either

 

HOLY LAND to ISRAEL (QURAN)

Surprisingly enough, the Holy Land is mentioned in the Quran as the land that was written by Allah to Israel

Quran 5:21 Moses: O,my people, enter the holy land that God Has written for you, and do not turn your backs, or you will become losers

Quran 17:104 And We said after him to the Children of Israel: Dwell in the land, when the time of the second promise comes, We will bring you all together as a mixed crowd

 

ALIYA
aliyah_making aliyah_first steps_icon

Jews are coming back home from the Diaspora

Ezekiel 36:24

For I will take you from among the nations, gather you out of all countries, and bring you back into your own land

 

JERUSALEM JEWISH HOLY CITY 3000 YEARS AGO

Jerusalem has been a Jewish holy city since the days of King David 3000 years ago

At the time the Arabs were still pagans who used to worship idols such as Al Uzza, Al Lat and Al Mannat at the Kaaba (jahiliyya period)

Islam – the youngest among the three Monotheistic religions (est. 1400 years ago)

In the year 638 CE the muslims captured Jerusalem from the Byzantines and built Mosque on the site of the Jewish holy Temple.

 

JEWS or MUSLIMS in HOLIEST PLACE?

Question: Direction of Prayer

14Jews pray facing Jerusalem and the Temple Mount

 

 

 

 

09Muslims pray towards the city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia, When they pray in Jerusalem they point their behind to the Dome of the Rock and the Temple mount

 

IS JERUSALEM ISLAMIC HOLY SITE

Some muslims believe Jerusalem is Islamic holy site.

07An “Islamic holy site“?

palestinians use the temple mount as playground where they have picnics and play soccer.

Ibn Taymiyyah (1263-1328) – One of the most important Islamic scholars wrote: “in Jerusalem, there is not a place one calls sacred, and the same holds true for the tombs of Hebron.

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