Veiling Women: Islamists’ Most Powerful Weapon

• The first victim of the Islamist war in Algeria was a girl who refused the veil, Katia Bengana, who defended her choice even as the executioners pointed a gun at her head. In 1994, Algiers literally awoke to walls plastered with posters announcing the execution of unveiled women.

• In April 1947, Princess Lalla Aisha gave a speech in Tangiers and people listened astonished to that unveiled girl. In a few weeks, women throughout the country refused the scarf. Today Morocco is one of the freest countries in the Arab world.

• In the mid-1980s, sharia law was implemented in many countries, women in the Middle East were placed in a portable prison and in Europe they resumed the veil to reclaim their “identity,” which meant the refusal of assimilation to Western values and the Islamization of many European cities.

• First veils were imposed on women, then Islamists began their jihad against the West.

Laurence Rossignol, France’s Minister for the Family, Children and Women’s Rights, sparked a furor about the Islamic veil proliferating in her country, when she compared headscarved women to “American negroes who accepted slavery.” In addition, Elisabeth Badinter, one of France’s most famous feminists, even called for boycotting Europe’s fashion companies, such as Uniqlo and Dolce & Gabbana, which are developing Islamically correct clothes (in 2013, Muslims spent $266 billion dollars on clothing, and the figure could reach $484 billion by 2019).

A new trend is also emerging in Western popular culture, which was almost invisible in the media a decade ago: headscarved women are now also present in television programs such as MasterChef.

The mainstream culture now considers veiling women “normal.” Air France recently called on its female employees to wear veils while in Iran. The government of Italy recently veiled nude sculptures at Rome’s Capitoline Museum during a visit by Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani, out of “respect” for his sensibilities.

In the Arab-Islamic world, however, for a long time covered women were the exception.

It is hard to believe that, until the early 1990s, the majority of women in Algeria were not veiled. On May 13, 1958 at Place du Gouvernement in Algiers, dozens of women tore off their veils. Miniskirts invaded the streets.

Iran’s Revolution reversed this trend: the first scarf appeared at the beginning of the 1980s with the rise of the Islamic movements in Algeria’s universities and poor neighborhoods. The hijab was distributed by the Iranian Embassy in Algiers.

In 1990, Algeria was on the edge of a long season of death and fear: a civil war, with the specter of Islamist breakthrough (100,000 dead). People knew that something terrible was going to happen by counting the number of veils in the streets.

The first victim of the Islamist war in Algeria was a girl who refused the veil, Katia Bengana. She defended her choice even as the executioners pointed a gun at her head. In 1994, Algiers literally awoke to walls plastered with Islamist posters announcing the execution of unveiled women. Today, very few women dare to leave their house without a hijab or chador.

Look at the photographs of Kabul in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and you will see many unveiled women. Then came the Taliban and covered them. The emancipation in Morocco was sparked by Princess Lalla Aisha, the daughter of Sultan Mohamed Ben Youssef, who took the title of king when the country proclaimed independence. In April 1947, Lalla gave a speech in Tangiers and people listened astonished to that unveiled girl. In a few weeks, women throughout the country refused the scarf. Today Morocco is one of the freest countries in the Arab world.

Look at the photographs of Kabul in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and you will see many unveiled women. Then came the Taliban and covered them.

In Egypt, back in the 1950s, President Gamal Abdel Nasser took to television to mock the Muslim Brotherhood’s request to veil the women. His wife, Tahia, did not wear a scarf, even in official photographs. Today, according to the scholar Mona Abaza, 80% of Egyptian women are veiled. It was only in the 1990s that the strict Wahhabi version of Islam arrived in Egypt, through millions of Egyptians who went to work in Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries. Meanwhile, Islamist political movements gained ground. Then Egyptian women began sporting the veil.

In Iran, the traditional black veil covering Iranian women from head to ankles, invaded the country under Ayatollah Khomeini. He asserted that the chador is the “banner of the revolution” and imposed it on all the women.

Fifty years earlier, in 1926, Reza Shah had provided police protection to women who had chosen to refuse the veil. On January 7, 1936, the Shah ordered all the teachers, the wives of ministers and government officials “to appear in European clothes.” The Shah asked his wife and daughters to go unveiled in public. These and other Western reforms were supported by Shah Muhammad Reza Pahlavi, who succeeded his father in September 1941, and instituted the ban on veiled women in public.

In Turkey, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk harangued female crowds, pushing them to set an example: taking off the veil meant hastening the necessary rapprochement between Turkey and Western civilization. For fifty years, Turkey refused the veil — until 1997, when the government headed by the Islamist Necmettin Erbakan abolished the ban on the veil in public places.

Turkey’s Erdogan used the veil to encourage the rampant Islamization of the society.

In contrast, Tunisia’s President, Habib Bourguiba, issued a circular banning the wearing of hijab in schools and public offices. He called the veil “odious rag,” and promoted his country as one of the most enlightened Arab nations.

It was not only the Muslim world that for a long time refused this symbol. Before the spread of radical Islam, the miniskirt, a symbol of Western culture, could also be seen all over the Middle East. There are many photographs to remind us of that long period: the unveiled stewardesses in skirts of the Afghan airline (what an irony that Air France today wants to veil them); the beauty contest that King Hussein of Jordan organized at Hotel Philadelphia; the Iraqi female football team; the Syrian female athlete Silvana Shaheen; the unveiled Libyan women marching in the streets; the female students at the Palestinian Birzeit University and the Egyptian girls on the beach (at that time, a burkini would have been rejected as a cage).

Then, in the mid-1980s, everything suddenly changed: Sharia law was implemented in many countries, women in the Middle East were placed in a portable prison, and in Europe they resumed the veil to reclaim their “identity,” which meant the refusal of assimilation to Western values and the Islamization of many European cities.

First veils were imposed on women, then Islamists began their jihad against the West.

First we betrayed these women by accepting their slavery as a “liberation,” then Air France started veiling women while in Iran as a form of “respect.” It is also revealing of the hypocrisy of most of Western feminists, who are always ready to denounce the “homophobic” Christians and “sexism” in the U.S., but keep silent about the sexual crimes of radical Islam. In the words of the feminist Rebecca Brink Vipond, “I won’t take the bait of a patronizing call for feminists to set aside their goals in America to address problems in Muslim theocracies.” These are the same feminists who abandoned Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the brave Dutch-Somali dissident from Islam, to her own defenses even after she found refuge in the U.S.: they prevented her from speaking at Brandeis University.

For how long we will maintain our ban on female genital mutilation (FGM)?

A study just published in the U.S. suggests that allowing some “milder” forms of female mutilation, which affect 200 million women in the world, is more “culturally sensitive” than a ban on the practice, and that a ritual “nick” of girls’ vaginas could prevent a more radical disfiguring practice. The proposal didn’t come from Tariq Ramadan or an Islamic court in Sudan, but from two American gynecologists, Kavita Shah Arora and Allan J. Jacobs, who published the study in one of the most important scientific journals, the Journal of Medical Ethics.

It is a testament to the depths that can be reached in what the French “new philosopher,” Pascal Bruckner, called “the tears of White men” with their masochism, cowardice and cynical relativism. Why not also justify the Islamic stoning of women who are said to commit adultery? It is as if we cannot capitulate quickly enough.

April 20, 2016 at 5:30 am | by Giulio Meotti | http://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/7834/islam-veiled-women
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ISIS Forced 17-Y-O Girl to Recite Quran While Being Raped, Burned Her With Boiling Water When She Refused

Raw Islam feature

(PHOTO: FACEBOOK/DELAL SINDY)

Humanitarian activist Delal Sindy playing with displaced Iraq children at a refugee camp in northern Iraq.

by Samuel Smith  
According to a Kurdish activist who works closely with Iraqis displaced by the Islamic State, ISIS militants allegedly forced a 17-year-old Yazidi girl to recite parts of the Quran while she was being raped. And when she refused, she was punished by having boiling water poured on her.

Twenty-three-year-old Delal Sindy, who is from Sweden, has been working as a humanitarian worker in the Kurdish-protected northern Iraq since October 2014. In a Monday Facebook post that has been shared over 13,000 times, Sindy shared the tragic story of one recently escaped Yazidi refugee girl she met named Suzan, who is now 17, and pregnant after being subjected to ISIS’ brutal sexual slavery.

According to Sindy’s post, Suzan, her 10-year-old sister and mother were originally taken captive by ISIS and transported to a hotel in Mosul called “The Galaxy,” which is essentially a sex slave market filled with half-naked women and girls. The last day Suzan and her sister saw their mother was the day they were sold out of the hotel and shipped to Raqqa, Syria.

Once in Raqqa, Suzan and her sister, along with other girls, were forced to dress up and were inspected to see if they were virgins. Suzan said she was sold cheap because she was not as attractive as the other girls, while her sister was given away as a gift to a senior ISIS member.

Sindy’s post explains that Suzan, along with two other girls, became the property of an ISIS militant named “Al Russiyah.” Each morning the girls would be forced to line up so that Russiyah could decide which girl would be his personal sex toy for the day. The other girls that Russiyah didn’t pick would be subject to even more physical and sexual abuse at the hands of Russiyah’s body guards.

"He then lined us up three naked each morning, felt on us, smelled on us. ... Then he chose who he wanted for the day," Sindy quoted Suzan as saying in a translated version of her Facebook Post. "[The guards] were horrible. They beat me and was always at least two at the same time. In the end, I [would be] lucky to end up with Al Russiyah instead of [the guards] beating us. It was like choosing between death and death."

"His guards raped me at least five times a day," Suzan continued. "They forced me to say things from the Quran while they did their [actions], otherwise they whipped me."

(PHOTO: FACEBOOK/DELAL SINDY)

Delal Sindy shared this photo along with her widely circulated post on 17-year-old Yazidi "Suzan,"

Sindy added that one time when Suzan refused to give into the militants’ demands they burned her with boiling water to teach her to obey their commands.

“Once he burned my thigh with hot boiling water because I refused,” she added. “I dared no more after that.”

Suzan said she fled after she and the rest of Russiyah’s slaves were taken to Sinjar while he fought in battle. Russiya was killed in battle, while his guards were injured.

“That was when we fled,” Suzan explained. “The other girls ran back for they were afraid. … But I continued. It took me three days to get to the mountain, where Kurdish soldiers helped me.”

Although Suzan is now out of the hands of the Islamic State, she still wishes she had been killed because now she realizes that she has lost most of her family and her uncle that she has lived with since escaping ISIS has threatened to kill her because she was impregnated by an ISIS fighter.

“My uncle who I lived with up until a week ago said he would kill me if he found out that ISIS had done anything with me, because of the honor,” Suzan said. “I escaped from there immediately. Now I hide here … pregnant in the third month and do not know what to do. The easiest way out is to die. “

“I wish they had killed me instead,” she asserted. “My dad is dead, I have no idea where my mom and sister are. What do I have to live for? I try to forget everything but even when I close my eyes, I see them in front of me. I want to kill myself.”

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by Samuel Smith | CP Reporter | May 28, 2015 | Original Source: christianpost.com "ISIS Forced 17-Y-O Girl to Recite Quran While Being Raped, Burned Her With Boiling Water When She Refused"
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ISIS ‘Burned Alive’ 20-Y-O Girl After She Refused ‘Extreme Sex Act,’ Forces Sex Slaves to Become Prostitutes, UN Rep Says

Raw Islam feature

(PHOTO: REUTERS/STRINGER)

Displaced Sunni women fleeing the violence in Ramadi, carry bags as they walk on the outskirts of Baghdad, May 24, 2015. Iraqi forces recaptured territory from advancing Islamic State militants near the recently-fallen city of Ramadi on Sunday, while in Syria the government said the Islamists had killed hundreds of people since capturing the town of Palmyra.

by Samuel Smith
Islamic State militants have allegedly burned a 20-year-old women alive because she refused to perform what a United Nations official deemed was an “extreme sex act.” The same official also disclosed that ISIS is forcing some sex slaves to be prostitutes.

As The Christian Post previously reported, Zainab Bangura, the U.N.’s special representative on sexual crimes in war, recently conducted interviews with displaced ISIS victims in Iraq and Syria, as she toured through five Middle East countries compiling information on ISIS’ sex crimes.

Bangura, who also visited Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon, recently spoke with the Middle East Eye and provided more shocking details of the horrors that women and children face at the hands of ISIS’ systemic sex trafficking operations.

“They commit rape, sexual slavery, forced prostitution and other acts of extreme brutality,” Bangura asserted. “We heard one case of a 20-year-old girl who was burned alive because she refused to perform an extreme sex act. We learned of many other sadistic sexual acts. We struggled to understand the mentality of people who commit such crimes.”

Bangura, who also visited Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon, recently spoke with the Middle East Eye and provided more shocking details of the horrors that women and children face at the hands of ISIS’ systemic sex trafficking operations.

“They commit rape, sexual slavery, forced prostitution and other acts of extreme brutality,” Bangura asserted. “We heard one case of a 20-year-old girl who was burned alive because she refused to perform an extreme sex act. We learned of many other sadistic sexual acts. We struggled to understand the mentality of people who commit such crimes.”

(PHOTO: REUTERS/ASMAA WAGUIH)

Ilham, a Yazidi woman, folds the curtain of the tent where she lives in a refugee camp near Duhok, February 26, 2015.
Reuters photographer Asmaa Waguih: Ilham was kidnapped by Islamic State in August last year and was transported to Tal Afar along with other girls and women. She was raped several times by one of the militants. When Ilham tried to escape, some people she asked for help handed her back to the militants. She managed to get away a few weeks later. At refugee camps in northern Iraq I met and photographed Yazidi women who had survived being kidnapped by Islamic State.

I needed government approval to visit some of the camps. The camp officials wanted to protect the women and were wary of the fact that I had a camera. It took a while for the women to get used to me. But when they did, they were happy to share their stories, to tell me what had happened to them.

It is very difficult for women living in a quiet, conservative area to admit they have faced sexual violence. In some cases, I heard from camp officials that a woman had been raped, but when I met her she would speak of the brutality of the militants and then mention knowing that some women had even been raped. In general, escapees would try to find a time when the militants were busy working and then seek help. Sometimes people would agree to hide them and then find cars to take them to other areas. At other times they would return the women to Islamic State. Some had managed to escape in groups. Others had family members still being held by the insurgents. It’s a disastrous situation for these families’ and it’s not over yet.

Through the course of Bangura’s investigation, she has gained an understanding of how ISIS processes religious minority women and girls through its sex slave operation. After capturing the women and girls, Bangura said militants check them to see if they are virgins and examine the women for the features before shipping them off to be sold in sex slave markets.

“After attacking a village, IS splits women from men and executes boys and men aged 14 and over. The women and mothers are separated; girls are stripped naked, tested for virginity and examined for breast size and prettiness,” she said. “The youngest, and those considered the prettiest virgins fetch higher prices and are sent to Raqqa, the IS stronghold.”

In a media briefing earlier this month, Bangura stated that ISIS even strips girls naked and puts them on display for sale in sex slave “bazaars.”

In her interview with Middle East Eye, she further explained the pecking order in which the ISIS chain of command gets to pick which girls they get to buy, take home, rape and beat.

“There is a hierarchy: sheikhs get first choice, then emirs, then fighters. They often take three or four girls each and keep them for a month or so, until they grow tired of a girl, when she goes back to market,” Bangura said. “At slave auctions, buyers haggle fiercely, driving down prices by disparaging girls as flat-chested or unattractive.”

As virgins are valued more in ISIS sex slave markets, Bangura told the media briefing that one enslaved woman, who was bought and sold by over 20 different ISIS fighters, was forced to undergo virginity restoration surgery each time she was give to another ISIS fighter. She also mentioned how another sex slave was sold over 22 times.

As more and more radicalized foreign fighters are joining ISIS from nations all over the world, Bangura said that means more fighters are coming with the expectation of receiving a sex slave or jihadi bride, thus continuing to fuel the market.

“To understand this, we must examine the concept of jihad al-nikah, or sexual jihad — whereby women’s bodies are used as part of supporting the IS campaign,” Bangura stated. “There are tens of thousands of men who expect that they will ‘get’ women to ‘marry.’ A woman’s contribution is to marry them and cater for them in many ways, including sexually. IS men may have a wife, as well as several slaves. We heard few stories of wives who helped the slaves to escape.”

by Samuel Smith | CP Reporter | May 26, 2015 | Original Source: christianpost.com "ISIS 'Burned Alive' 20-Y-O Girl After She Refused 'Extreme Sex Act,' Forces Sex Slaves to Become Prostitutes, UN Rep Says"
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ISIS Slavery Highlights Problem in Muslim World- Israel News

About Islam Religion feature
First publised December 12, 2014 By JNS breakingisraelnews.com

Whoever steals a man and sells him, and anyone found in possession of him, shall be put to death.” (Exodus 21:16)

Yazidi children and families rest and shelter from the sun at Nawrouz refugee camp. (Photo: UNICEF Syria/2014/Razan Rashidi)

Every evening, silence reigns in the Khanke refugee camp near the Kurdish city of Dohuk in northern Iraq. Winter has already arrived, bringing with it rain, mud, and cold.

A fire has been lit for warmth, but the flame is potentially dangerous. A Yazidi family is crowded into each tent. The tents afford no protection from the rain, and if any of the structures catch fire, they can turn into death traps. About 60,000 Yazidis live in this camp. Last summer, they managed to survive and escape from Mount Sinjar, which was taken over by the Islamic State terror group. Every person at the camp knows someone who was either killed or wounded, or is currently missing. Every refugee has a sister, wife, or daughter who was kidnapped and raped.

Some of them have already seen the video footage on YouTube showing the modern slave markets in Syria and Iraq, and the women who have fallen into bondage. According to these video clips and the accounts that are trickling out of Raqqah, the Islamic State “capital” in Syria, and from Mosul, its stronghold in Iraq, the women are sold at auction to the highest bidder. Prices vary—virgins are worth $100, while women who have borne children fetch roughly $10. The jihadists of Islamic State, using passages from the Koran as their justification, regard the Yazidis as idol-worshippers who may be bought and sold like sheep.

The situation is growing worse in regions taken over by Islamic State. Public executions and amputations mandated by Shariah, the Islamic system of religious law, are carried out every day just a few miles from the Turkish border. Children under 10 years old train with live ammunition, and thousands of Yazidi and Kurdish women are enslaved.

The Muslim world looks on in silence—almost no condemnations are heard, perhaps because some of the norms of the Islamic caliphate established by Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi are customary in other places in the Middle East.

Yazidi women being rounded up by ISIS.

“Saudi Arabia, which says it uses… the Wahhabi interpretation of Islam as the predominant law for its country, the only difference between them and ISIS (Islamic State) is that [Islamic State] is public and brazen about what it does,” Dr. Zuhdi Jasser, founder and president of the American Islamic Forum for Democracy (AIFD), told JNS.org.

Some of the women enslaved by Islamic State have managed to escape, including by contacting their families to convey ransom demands from the terror group. The ransom in certain cases is as high as $5,000 for a young woman or teenage girl, and very few families are able to raise that sum. According to reports, the Kurdish government has already paid Islamic State more than $1.5 million in ransom for male and female Yazidi captives.

A woman who manages to escape continues to live in fear of the Islamic State terrorists, and in fear of the rapists and murderers in Syria and Iraq. These women have made long journeys on foot to find that they don’t have a home to return to—Mount Sinjar, the place where the Yadizi community lived for thousands of years, is under Islamic State control.

Now, the women are living in Erbil, in Dohuk, and in refugee camps set up by the Kurdish government. They are lonely, collapsing under the trauma they have suffered. Paulo Kosaka, a well-known Portuguese politician who visited Erbil, described his meeting with one of the Yazidi teenage girls who managed to flee captivity.

“When the girl was kidnapped and handed over to one of the members of Islamic State in Raqqa, Syria, she was forced to convert to Islam and pray five times a day. She was forcibly married, and her husband abused her,” he said.

In tears, the Yazidi girl told Kosaka about where she lived in captivity for several months. It was across the street from a mosque, and the call to prayer was what frightened her the most.

“During the conversation, as she told about the experiences she had undergone, she fainted from the pain, and after that she did not speak anymore,” said Kosaka, who has learned that slavery is more widespread than U.N. experts who visited the region last summer estimated.

“At least several thousand women were enslaved overnight,” he said. “In many cases, these are very young girls, only 11 or 12 years old.”

Dr. Mirza Dinnayi, one of the heads of the Yazidi community and a former adviser to the president of Iraq, is also in Erbil. With help from several German organizations, he is trying to get the women to Germany, where they can receive treatment and rehabilitation. At best, several dozen of them will get proper treatment and begin new lives. All the others, both men and women, will carry the trauma forever.

The Arab world’s indifference

Few of the women are willing to share what they went through—the auction in the slave market, the gang rapes, and the abuse. Many Yazidis draw a parallel between the silence of some of the traumatized women and the silence of the world. When Mount Sinjar was overrun by Islamic State forces, who killed and enslaved thousands of people, the global media hardly took notice.

When the American army airlifted humanitarian aid to the refugees who were dying of hunger and thirst, the Yazidis suddenly became a focus of interest in the West, but that interest did not last long. At present, it seems that the world has resigned itself to the fact that a bleeding nation remains homeless and that its women have been forced into bondage.

“Two questions come up in that context,” Kosaka said.

Why was the world silent when all of this happened, and why it is impossible, at this stage, to retake these cities—Raqqah and Mosul—which have markets for trafficking slaves?

Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, has expressed shock that the Arab Muslim world is not condemning Islamic State more frequently. One letter, signed by 126 Islamic clerics two months ago, described the actions of Islamic State as a violation of Islamic law. But these efforts seem to have barely made a ripple in the Arab world.

The signatories of the letter “most of whom are Western, are the ‘who is who’ of the Muslim Brotherhood movement in the West,” said Jasser, who is currently leading the AIFD in preparing a written response.

The reason they signed that letter…was that the Muslim Brotherhood, the founders and leaders of political Islam in the West and globally, (or) the ones who believe in political Islam or the Islamic state (concept) but do so in a non-violent way, are running for cover now wherever possible because they are horrified by what (the Islamic State) is doing to their branding. Yet if you read the letter…they don’t say that the caliphate is bad, they say that al-Baghdadi’s caliphate is wrong because he declared it in an incorrect way. They don’t say jihad (as a whole) is bad…(just that) al-Baghdadi’s jihad is wrong,” he said.

It’s like when “fighting drunk driving, and they’re trying to say that the alcoholism is ok, it’s just that you’re doing it in a violent and draconian way,” Jasser said. “But they haven’t changed the drug, and the drug is Islamism, the Islamic state [concept], caliphism, and jihadism. Until we as Muslims condemn them as a whole, they are always going to end up feeding into radical groups.”

Islamic State merely does openly what others do in secret.

Black jeeps with license plates from the Persian Gulf states arrive every day at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, in which roughly 18,000 Syrian refugees are crowded together. Inside the jeeps are wealthy men from Jordan and the Gulf states who are looking for wives. Journalist Henrique Cymerman visited the camp as part of a report for Israel’s Channel 2 network. He spoke with young girls who were about to be forcibly married to these men—men who soon afterward would grow tired of their new wives and had no hesitation about divorcing them and sending them back to the refugee camp. The girls who marry these men from the Gulf states are sometimes as young as 13 or 14. Their families receive a sum of money, usually a few hundred dollars, as a dowry, and the girls return to the camp shortly afterward.

I married because of my family’s terrible financial situation,” said Olah, a 13-year-old Syrian bride who married a 60-year-old man from Saudi Arabia.

“The situation in the refugee camps in Syria and Jordan, in Turkey and Lebanon, is unbelievable,” said Ahmed, a Syrian refugee whose family is still in Syria. “The women who live there have already been through the worst—rape, abuse, loss of all their relatives and their homes—and now, in these camps, their suffering continues.”

Ahmed added, “It’s very sad that the exploitation is being abetted by the Syrians themselves and by other Arabs.”

ISIS militants in Syria. (Photo: YouTube Screenshot)

Cymerman said that Syrian women work as matchmakers in the refugee camps.

“The men order the brides according to specific criteria—16 or 17 years old, virgins, and with a specific eye color,” he said.

Such activities take place not only in refugee camps, but also in countries like Egypt. In “bride cities” such as El Hammadiya, which is located near Cairo, several motels and lawyers’ offices arrange legal marriages between wealthy men from Gulf states and local girls. According to reports in the Arabic and Egyptian media, marriages of this kind can be arranged for just $80.

Jasser said that the way Islamic State
treats minorities, and the way it treats women, is just an exaggerated version of what is done in every one of [the Middle East’s] Islamic states. Some of them are just more mild and covert at the way they do it.

Psychological warfare under religious auspices

A horrific video shared on social media shows members of Islamic State boasting about the slave girls that they had just bought or would soon be buying—and the response of many Internet users in Egypt and Jordan was frighteningly supportive.

Islam does not prohibit owning male or female slaves as long as they are treated fairly,” wrote one user with the screen name “al-Bukhari.”

According to Kosaka, Islamic State excels at using psychological warfare, and there are no prominent Islamic leaders to set a moderate example in Arab and Muslim countries.

The members of Islamic State frighten the Iraqi soldiers,” Kosaka said. “They tell the soldiers that if they free the Yazidi women who converted to Islam and return them to their families, they will cause the women to renounce Islam. Anyone who does such a deed will burn in hellfire, they say, since he will be given the same judgment as an apostate. So what is necessary is a decision by religious clerics in Iraq that such conversions are a violation of Islamic law.

Legally, one might try to distinguish between the forced marriages of women in Jordan’s refugee camps and girls from poor Egyptian families on the one hand, and the enslavement of Yazidi women on the other. But in either scenario, women—be they Yazidi or Egyptian—are treated like objects that may be bought, sold, and discarded when they are no longer needed. The members of Islamic State did not come out of nowhere. Before they even joined the group, they were raised to follow radical Islam and lived in a traditional society that sees women as less valuable than men.

via ISIS Slavery Highlights Problem in Muslim World- Israel News.

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